Surgeonfish

Surgeonfish

 

Surgeonfish are named because of the scalpel-like blade found on either side of their cordal peduncle (between the body and tail). They can be brightly coloured and swim quickly over the reef.

Striped Surgeonfish © WiseOceans

Striped Surgeonfish © WiseOceans

Striped Surgeonfish (Acanthurus lineatus)

Striped surgeonfish have a yellow base colour with numerous dark and light blue stripes along the length of the body. It has a blue tail and a light blue belly. Although there are many striped surgeonfish present on most reefs they are considered to be solitary. (up to 38cm)

Powder-blue Surgeonfish © WiseOceans

Powder-blue Surgeonfish © WiseOceans

Powder-blue Surgeonfish (Acanthurus leucosternon)

The Powder-blue surgeonfish is often seen on the reef. Their colours are simple and clean, with a blue body and dark bead. They have a yellow dorsal fin, and white-blue ventral, anal and tail fins. They are usually seen alone on the reef, but have been known to school in large numbers. (up to 38cm).

Orange-Spine Unicornfish © WiseOceans

Orange-Spine Unicornfish © WiseOceans

Sub-family – Unicornfish

Unicornfish are a sub-family of Surgeonfish.  Similarly to the Surgeonfish they also have spines on their cordal-peduncal but the Unicornfish have 2 on each side.

Orange-spine unicornfish (Naso lituratus) have a dark body with orange tail spines and anal fin. They have yellow shading behind the eye and mouth. They are commonly seen in small groups casually swimming over the reef. (up to 50cm)

 

 

All photos © WiseOceans unless otherwise stated

 

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